Po Man’s Child

{Warning: This review mentions a sexual practice some readers may find offensive or troubling. Also, suicide, self-mutilation, and drug addiction.} It has been said the sins of the parents sometimes come to rest on the back of the children; that in order to shake free of past tragedies, one must fully face them and accept the lessons they aim to teach. Based on my reading of Po Man’s Child by Marci Blackman, I understand the validity of dealing with family Read More …

Yabo

I don’t remember when or how, but I was introduced to a snippet of Yabo many months ago through the characters Ruby, Ramses, and Jules. Yabo was released in 2014, and finally, in 2017, I can remove it from my TBR list with much delight. If Yabo has been lingering on your (Black/lesbian/queer) TBR list too, move it to the top. Make it a priority. This book ain’t for the faint of heart. You must read with care and memory, Read More …

Happiness, Like Water

I love short story collections. They offer readers a chance to walk a mile in so many different shoes. Each story is an opportunity to be someone different, and experience reality through the eyes of a character completely opposite in every way imaginable. The mark of a great collection is one where no matter how many characters dwell within its pages or the scenarios they experience, the reader can see herself or understand their choices. Happiness, Like Water flows with Read More …

Five Classic Black Lesbian Books that You’ve Probably Never Heard of But Need to Read

I recently attended a literary conference focused on lesbian literature and was shocked at how many attendees didn’t know anything about Black lesbian literature outside of two or three authors. Most were familiar with Jewelle Gomez’s The Gilda Stories, which celebrated its 25th anniversary last year, and Audre Lorde, the consummate Black lesbian poet, but that was about it. Full disclosure: I wrote an entire dissertation on the marginalization of Black lesbian literature, so I might know more about Black Read More …

I Am Your Sister: Collected and Unpublished Writings of Audre Lorde

Every once in a while, the BLLC Review  will feature a brief, academic-ish review of a non-fiction Black lesbian text. This is our first offering. I Am Your Sister: Collected and Unpublished Writings of Audre Lorde is in part inspired by the opening of the Audre Lorde Papers housed at the Spelman Archives at Spelman College, where co-editors Beverly Guy-Sheftall and Johnetta B. Cole have been faculty and administrators. The Arcus grant that funded the processing of the archives also established Read More …