An Unkindness of Ghosts

Happy New Year folks! And happy one-year anniversary to The BLLC Review. I’m elated to kick-off year #2 with a review of An Unkindness of Ghosts. Rivers Solomon’s debut science-fiction novel is laced with well-built characters and subplots that sustain an intensely painted dystopian world. Overview: A sparse number of Read More …

Once and Future Lovers-Repost

The BLLC Review is on hiatus in December, so we’re re-posting some of our most popular reviews this month, which includes Once & Future Lovers— a short story collection by Sheree L. Greer. As the titles suggests, love threads the stories together, but prominent themes such as family and maturation Read More …

Write What You [Don’t] Know

“Write what you know” is an idiom in the creative writing world as common as “show, don’t tell.” These nuggets of writing advice are well meaning, but sometimes, advice without explication can be as useless as a bag of potpourri in a landfill. I recently attended a creative writing conference Read More …

The State of Black Lesbian Publishing

Topics in Black Lesbian Publishing is a podcast series that aims to address Black lesbian writing from a publisher’s perspective. In this introductory episode, Lauren and Stephanie discuss challenges they have encountered in publishing and writing communities.

Smoketown

Smoketown is a science fiction novel by Tenea D. Johnson. A Kentucky native, Johnson named the story after Louisville’s Smoketown, a historically African American neighborhood that housed a “large number of (smoke-producing) kilns.”[1] Johnson retains the history of the people and place in her novel and transforms the futuristic Smoketown Read More …

Once and Future Lovers

If you aren’t familiar with Sheree L. Greer, let me introduce you to her debut short story collection, Once and Future Lovers. As the titles suggests, love threads the stories together, but prominent themes such as family and maturation are also infused in the characters and their experiences. The collection Read More …

The Summer We Got Free

The Summer We Got Free by Mia McKenzie opens in 1976 in West Philadelphia at the Delaney family home. It’s a neglected dwelling that mirrors the emotional and spiritual state of the five-member family. Thirty-year-old Ava (the protagonist) resides with her husband (Paul), older sister (Sarah), and parents (Regina and Read More …

21 Questions

21 Questions by Mason Dixon is a fast-paced, contemporary romance featuring Kenya Davis, a successful thirty-six-year-old professional on a quest to find love. Kenya is in search of a traditional love, the kind that’s built upon trust, honesty, and mutual respect. But, there’s a catch. She wants a woman that Read More …

Yabo

I don’t remember when or how, but I was introduced to a snippet of Yabo many months ago through the characters Ruby, Ramses, and Jules. Yabo was released in 2014, and finally, in 2017, I can remove it from my TBR list with much delight. If Yabo has been lingering Read More …

Pat Greene: Her Story

In Pat Greene: Her Story, Anondra “Kat” Williams has crafted autofiction by permitting Patricia “Pat” Greene to recall her life, lovers, and heartbreaks. Some chapters are named for and exclusive to a single lover. In a way, this is a coming-of-age story because Pat relays (through a series of reflections Read More …