Bury Me When I’m Dead

Bury Me When I’m Dead by Cheryl Head is a good old-fashioned whodunit, starring a cast of well-developed characters that help to ground its complex plot. Before I begin, a caveat or two: The protagonist of this novel isn’t lesbian, she’s bisexual, and that adds a little something extra to the plot (more on this later). Also, I haven’t read a mystery in a LONG time, so I wasn’t sure what to expect. Do these things have a formula? Still, Read More …

Po Man’s Child

{Warning: This review mentions a sexual practice some readers may find offensive or troubling. Also, suicide, self-mutilation, and drug addiction.} It has been said the sins of the parents sometimes come to rest on the back of the children; that in order to shake free of past tragedies, one must fully face them and accept the lessons they aim to teach. Based on my reading of Po Man’s Child by Marci Blackman, I understand the validity of dealing with family Read More …

21 Questions

21 Questions by Mason Dixon is a fast-paced, contemporary romance featuring Kenya Davis, a successful thirty-six-year-old professional on a quest to find love. Kenya is in search of a traditional love, the kind that’s built upon trust, honesty, and mutual respect. But, there’s a catch. She wants a woman that matches her financial prowess, and she refuses to settle for less. Kenya thought she had found Ms. Right upon meeting Mackenzie Richardson at a speed dating event in South Beach Read More …

First Bloom-Stories of Blossoming Black Lesbian Love

  Love is such a complex emotion it sometimes defies explanation. It can inspire someone to stretch themselves beyond their comfort zone. For others, it prompts contortions to avoid causing pain or discomfort to those who they care about. It can make someone run toward a burning building or walk away from a life of comfort. First Bloom-Stories of Blossoming Black Lesbian Love is a collection of stories edited by Saydeah E. Howard that provides literary examples of all the Read More …

Yabo

I don’t remember when or how, but I was introduced to a snippet of Yabo many months ago through the characters Ruby, Ramses, and Jules. Yabo was released in 2014, and finally, in 2017, I can remove it from my TBR list with much delight. If Yabo has been lingering on your (Black/lesbian/queer) TBR list too, move it to the top. Make it a priority. This book ain’t for the faint of heart. You must read with care and memory, Read More …

Difficult Women

I recently read Roxane Gay’s Difficult Women and when I finished, I felt like I needed a surgeon to put my heart back together. This collection of short fiction is powerful, at times hard to read, so much so that I’d advise to you read it a story or two at a time. Before my review, a caveat or two: Roxane Gay does not identify as a Black lesbian, which is generally a prerequisite for a book to be reviewed Read More …

Happiness, Like Water

I love short story collections. They offer readers a chance to walk a mile in so many different shoes. Each story is an opportunity to be someone different, and experience reality through the eyes of a character completely opposite in every way imaginable. The mark of a great collection is one where no matter how many characters dwell within its pages or the scenarios they experience, the reader can see herself or understand their choices. Happiness, Like Water flows with Read More …

Pat Greene: Her Story

In Pat Greene: Her Story, Anondra “Kat” Williams has crafted autofiction by permitting Patricia “Pat” Greene to recall her life, lovers, and heartbreaks. Some chapters are named for and exclusive to a single lover. In a way, this is a coming-of-age story because Pat relays (through a series of reflections and lessons) her emotional growth and the journey she took to achieve equilibrium. It took Pat several decades to realize her worth and truly understand and find love, but in Read More …

Callaloo & Other Lesbian Love Tales

Callaloo and Other Lesbian Love Tales is an impressive collection of short stories by LaShonda K. Barnett, who you may recall is the author of Jam on the Vine, reviewed on the The BLLC Review earlier this year. All of the stories focus on various aspects of love between women, and the stories are set in various time periods, (some historical), and locales.  A caveat: the collection was written in 1999, so at times it feels a bit dated, but Read More …

The Prosaic Soul of Nikki Giovanni

April is National Poetry Month so it would seem appropriate to sing the praise of Nikki Giovanni. The force behind classics such as Ego Tripping, Cotton Candy on A Rainy Day, and I Wrote a Good Omelet earned her place in the poetry pantheon many times over. While her poetry creates and celebrates wonderful what ifs, her prose addresses a world of what is. The Prosaic Soul of Nikki Giovanni is a collection of essays pulled from three of her Read More …