The Power of Mercy

The Power of Mercy by Fiona Zedde is the second book in a new superheroine series by lesbian publisher Ylva Publishing. If you’re already a fan of Zedde’s, The Power of Mercy is definitely a bit of a departure from her usual fare, which is exactly why I liked it so much. To be sure, sex is present in this story, but it’s not the focus, nor does it overpower the storytelling, but I’m getting ahead of myself. First, a Read More …

Nikki Harmon on Women-Centered Spaces and Storytelling

The following excerpt is part of our interview series where we talk to members of the lesbian literary community. A longer version of this interview will appear in an upcoming issue of our literary journal, Serendipity. Nikki Harmon, an alumna of The Philadelphia High School for Girls, Wesleyan University and Temple University, has always pursued academic challenges. However, cursed with an overabundance of curiosity, she chose a creative lifestyle as a way to indulge her many interests. As a filmmaker, television Read More …

Brown Girl in the Ring

When the first line of an author’s first novel involves someone searching for a viable human heart, the reader should not expect an easy literary ride. Nalo Hopkinson’s first novel, Brown Girl in the Ring, weaves a story of a young woman claiming her power through tapping into the spiritual belief of her ancestors. It is an exceptional read that plays upon all the reader’s senses and challenges. It reminds us to yield to its pull and accept that the Read More …

The Summer We Got Free

The Summer We Got Free by Mia McKenzie opens in 1976 in West Philadelphia at the Delaney family home. It’s a neglected dwelling that mirrors the emotional and spiritual state of the five-member family. Thirty-year-old Ava (the protagonist) resides with her husband (Paul), older sister (Sarah), and parents (Regina and George). George had moved his wife and small children from the Deep South with the hope of a better life, but a violent event wiped the semblance of happiness from Read More …

Bury Me When I’m Dead

Bury Me When I’m Dead by Cheryl Head is a good old-fashioned whodunit, starring a cast of well-developed characters that help to ground its complex plot. Before I begin, a caveat or two: The protagonist of this novel isn’t lesbian, she’s bisexual, and that adds a little something extra to the plot (more on this later). Also, I haven’t read a mystery in a LONG time, so I wasn’t sure what to expect. Do these things have a formula? Still, Read More …

JP Howard on Poetry, Family, and Writing Communities

The following excerpt is part of our interview series where we talk to members of the lesbian literary community. A longer version of this interview will appear in an upcoming issue of our literary journal, Serendipity. JP Howard aka Juliet P. Howard’s debut poetry collection, SAY/MIRROR, was a 2016 Lambda Literary finalist. She is also the author of bury your love poems here (Belladonna*). JP was a 2017 Split this Rock Freedom Plow Award for Poetry & Activism finalist and is featured in the 2017 Read More …

Po Man’s Child

{Warning: This review mentions a sexual practice some readers may find offensive or troubling. Also, suicide, self-mutilation, and drug addiction.} It has been said the sins of the parents sometimes come to rest on the back of the children; that in order to shake free of past tragedies, one must fully face them and accept the lessons they aim to teach. Based on my reading of Po Man’s Child by Marci Blackman, I understand the validity of dealing with family Read More …

21 Questions

21 Questions by Mason Dixon is a fast-paced, contemporary romance featuring Kenya Davis, a successful thirty-six-year-old professional on a quest to find love. Kenya is in search of a traditional love, the kind that’s built upon trust, honesty, and mutual respect. But, there’s a catch. She wants a woman that matches her financial prowess, and she refuses to settle for less. Kenya thought she had found Ms. Right upon meeting Mackenzie Richardson at a speed dating event in South Beach Read More …

Five Black Lesbian Books You Should be Reading for Pride Month

Pride month is nearly over, and there are lists upon lists of books LGBTQ folks should be reading circulating around the internet. Interestingly, most of them don’t have many, if any, Black lesbian books included on them. A wonderful exception is this list by Danika Ellis, head librarian over at the Lesbrary. In the spirit of reminding folks that Black lesbians are part of the LGBTQ community, and that we WRITE, here are five Black lesbian books you should be Read More …

Nik Nicholson on Writing and Learning to Love Your Characters

The following excerpt is part of our interview series where we talk to members of the lesbian literary community. A longer version of this interview will appear in an upcoming issue of our literary journal, Serendipity. Nik Nicholson became an artist as a teen, writing poetry and painting. She became a professional poet after being nurtured and recognized as a performer of spoken word at the West Las Vegas Art Center’s Poet’s Corner.  As a result, she was often contracted to Read More …